7 Reasons You Didn’t Get the Job

24.06.2016 12793

Employers are able to be picky when selecting the right candidate to get the job. Maybe you never got a call. Maybe your resume scored you an interview, but you did not get the job. Don’t get discouraged. Learn from your mistakes.

You Weren’t Prepared For The Interview

Many things can go wrong in an interview - from arriving late, dressing inappropriately, and texting during the discussions to bad-mouthing the people in your current or a former job. One of the most common — and deadly — mistakes is walking into the interview unprepared.

READ ALSO: Little Tricks That Will Help You In Job-Hunting Process

Thoughtful preparation and practice (with a friend or your mirror) before the interview will help to settle your nerves and improve your performance in the interview. Know your answers to the standard questions. Have examples of your accomplishments ready to discuss, to demonstrate your ability to do the job.

Your Resume Didn’t Sell You

In a competitive market, your resume really needs to stand out from crowd. Even if your resume has some good experience listed on it, it may well be overlooked if it doesn’t grab the attention of the reader. A good resume is a strong combination of relevant skills and experience with clear, concise presentation. Don’t waffle and remember to tweak your resume with each new job application so it’s tailored to that particular role.

You Failed To Sell Yourself

Your responsibility during the interview is to sell yourself and that includes carefully tooting your own horn. You may not have had to do much of this in the past, but times have changed. And don’t forget to follow up with a telephone call three or four days after an interview. It’s a great way to reinforce your interest in the job as well as ask a question or two that you may have forgotten to ask. As you leave the interview, ask yourself what impressions you left in the minds of the interviewers. Do they see you in the job, doing it well, and with a big smile on your face?

READ ALSO: 8 Great Ways To Hide Nervousness In An Interview

They Didn't Like You

People are different and teams that have been together have learned to function in a particular way. Likeability isn't something that comes across on a resume and to truly find out if you're a good fit for an organisation, the face to face meet up has to be done.

There's not much point in putting on a personality you think others will like; It'll be hard to keep up such a convincing act beyond the first month of landing the job. It's been said before a million times but we'll say it again - be yourself (the best possible version of yourself). If the interviewers don't understand or get you, it's better to keep hunting for a place you'll be comfortable.

You Failed To Establish Your Worth

When you give the impression that you are only interested in “what’s in it for me” without regard to what you have to offer, a job opportunity is often lost. The hiring manager wants to know what you can do for him or her. Candidates who fail to establish their worth are quickly eliminated. For example, if you have eight years of progressively responsible experience as an application engineer, you will want to make sure that the interviewer sees the value in your experience. You establish your worth by the specific things that you say in answer to his or her questions.

READ ALSO: When And Why You Should Keep Your Jokes to Yourself

You Were Nervous In A Bad Way

Nerves are actually fine — when I can tell someone's really nervous about meeting with me, I know they care about making a stellar impression and want the job, which is something I really look for. But if you're so nervous that you're forgetting key talking points or flubbing answers to more than two questions, your nerves are unfortunately working against you.

Hiring is tedious, incredibly challenging, and time-consuming. I desperately want every young whippersnapper who walks through my door to be The One. So if you feel your nerves getting the best of you, remember: the interviewer is on your side!

You Were Too Eager to Please

Believe it or not, appearing too eager for an interview is almost as harmful as being late and sloppy. Arriving, say, a half hour early for an interview can make the employer feel rushed to get to you. Also, having an overly enthusiastic tone during the interview might make you appear desperate for the job.

READ ALSO: There Is No Such Things As Signs Or Why You Can’t Predict Your Chances Of Getting A Job

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