Real Story: How Nigerian Scammer Was Scammed By His Victim

18.07.2015 10645

A Ukrainian startup manager, who lives in LA, could have become a victim of a scam-scheme, but has made it otherwise. He has outwitted a Nigerian scammer who was set on extorting money from him.

A girl named Angelina Crane tried to get aquainted with businessman through one of the russian social services. ‘Angelina’ told him she was an American currently residing in Nigeria. Than "girl" started to send him love-letters and then she asked if he could help her financially by transferring 50 or 60 US dollars a week. Mr Geraschenkov, immediately understood the fraudulent motive behind his new ‘lady’ friend’s request, decided to play along and expose the scammer. He replied by saying ‘Angelina’ was worth more than just $60 and suggested sending $500-600 instead. ‘Angelina’ immediately agreed and sent her personal details necessary for making the monetary transfer – the documents with the real name and photograph of the scammer, who, she said was her friend, Olukade Kehinde Martins.

   READ ALSO: How To Identify A Scam Interview Invitation

But this wasn't enough for "the victim". Mr Geraschenkov told ‘Angelina’ he was an Apple dealer and had, coincidentally, to ship 200 iPhones to Lagos. He said that the local Apple store had already paid for 199 of them, but he couldn't send 200 iPhones without paying for the last one. While the conversation was going startup manager sent the pictures of packed iPhones which he took from Google.

The Ukrainian promised her she could take two iPhone devices if she compensated the cost of last one of them. And if she did, she could take 2 iPhones instead of one.

   READ ALSO: Real Story: Sexual Harassment at Workplace

Eventually, Mr Geraschenkov convinced his "new love" Angelina-Olukade to send him $600. When he received the money, he told the scammer he, too, was a Nigerian residing in Lagos. Proving it by sending a picture of a Nigerian guy, which he also took from the web.

At the end, Ukrainian returned the money to scammer, claiming that a clean “karma” was more important. Well, at least we hope that a scammer learned a lesson!

Kedụ!

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