Your Resume Is Worthless If You Haven't Answered The Most Important Question

18.04.2016 6323

Looking for a job but not getting called for interviews? Have you ever imagined yourself in a potential employer’s shoes, looking at your resume, which is just one of a stack of resumes that could be four inches tall? Take a look at your resume and think would you hire yourself? If not, why?

Here's a secret: what every recruiter wants to see in resume is candidates accomplishments and achievements. Employers look for achievers, candidates who go above and beyond their job duties. Your resume allows you to describe your best accomplishments so employers want to take a chance on you. So, the most important question on your resume is what have you accomplished that makes you the best candidate for a job?

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To fill your resume with accomplishments, you need to reflect on your experience and think about how to demonstrate the benefits of what you’ve done—and how to back it up with numbers whenever possible.

If you think you have no career accomplishments, think again. Everybody has them; it's just a matter of digging down and pinpointing what they are.

If you're having tough time try writing down any work-related achievement that comes to your mind, no matter how small it may seem. Include any special projects on which that you worked, anytime that you received praise, promotions, challenging assignments or anything that made you feel proud while performing your jobs. You can start by including any awards and recognitions you have received, then list any other achievements that perhaps you didn't get public recognition for then start narrowing down the best choices and writing them in bullet form.

Rather than stating that 'you were responsible for a team of 10 people', you could instead say that you 'planned, arranged and hosted a team building away day, which resulted in improved communications within the office.

Additionally, how you phrase your accomplishments and which ones you emphasize will depend on the job for which you are applying. Curating your accomplishments is not just about choosing the best ones, it is about choosing the best ones for the job you want to have. A longer list does not impress if most of the points on it are unrelated to the job, so align your accomplishments to what would be assets in the new job. Place the greatest achievement at the top of the list under the respective position. Starting the explanation of your duties and responsibilities with an ambitious achievement can really make your resume stand out among the competition.

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Be prepared to explain how you achieved your results, how an award was decided, etc. For example, numbers in particular give more credibility to your statements but only use them if you can explain how they were measured.

Formulate strong statements that demonstrate your skills and experience in action, using terms that show you’re positive and pro-active rather than flimsy phrases.

After working with your resume and try reading it again. Now would you hire yourself?

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